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Archive for April, 2007

by Old Uncle Crow

UK Readers of Old Uncle Crow will enjoy learning that Lakese is a bona fide Minnesota dialect, although now in recession.

HOWEVER, It is a southern Minnesota form; and, its provenance is thus akin to a previous form of American spoken throughout the Minnesota territory & state in the mid-19th century.  The first American-speakers to surface here primarily were from New England; and, Lakese preserves successfully the New England ‘quack’ associated in the first days of american radio-broadcasting with (more…)

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by Old Uncle Crow

WITH His permission last night as we sat up until all hours and drinking gallons of scalding hot coffee (my neighbour is a teetotaler), I recorded the utterances of my eighty-seven years’ old farm-neighbour, Mr Judson (more…)

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by Old Uncle Crow

“JESUS Christ!” my maternal american uncle would blare, on some occasion or other when something I’d done meant more work for him, picking up after or repairing something:

“IF Brains were shit — you’d be (more…)

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Cats & Faeces: a Folk-Usage in 1950s Eagle Lk-Madison Lk, MN, Lakese-dialect

by OUC

I Note the reference to felines & their faeces in the article on idiolects; ‘shit’, eg, or cunoden(s).

A Usage of my late maternal uncle’s was an extended simile, in which also figured both (more…)

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by OUC

AN Idiolect is a word created by an individual & then used consistently, and as often as context applies, in their narrative-circle.  What allows comprehension in that narrative-circle is the fact that the originator has supplied (more…)

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Profane Invocation: the Name of God in the Daily Speech-Life of American Christian Farmers in the 1950s

by Old Uncle Crow

THE Following is a discussion of an aspect of specifically (more…)

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by Old Uncle Crow

A Farmer don’t live to get old unless he learns pretty quick that you can count (more…)

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